Annotated Bibliography on Contemporary Health Policy/Public Health Topics

Abouk, R. & Adams, A. (2017, Jan 31). Compliance inspections of tobacco retailers and youth smoking. American Journal of Health Economics, 3(1), 10-32. Retrieved from https://www.mitpressjournals.org/doi/full/10.1162/AJHE_a_00065

In the above article, the researchers examined the effect of the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) monitoring of tobacco retailers on accessibility and smoking among under-age youth. The monitoring survey data from 2010 to 2013 was involved in the research. The four year results indicated that the regular monitoring by FDA, limited the accessibility of tobacco among the youth. A significant reduction, however, was realized among girls. The study is carefully analyzed and the results are meticulously presented for easy understanding. The findings are also well interpreted to communicate their logic. This article contributes significantly to the topic of contemporary health and public policy.

Abraham, J.M., Feldman, R. & Graven, P. (2016, July 8). Employers’ changing economic incentives to offer health insurance under the Affordable Care Act. American Journal of Health Economics, 2(3), 273-299. Retrieved from https://www.mitpressjournals.org/doi/full/10.1162/AJHE_a_00045

The above study explored the effect of the provisions of ACA on the probability of offering employer-sponsored insurance (ESI). The research team utilized the 2008-2010 MEPS Insurance components alongside data from other sources to estimate the trends on employers’ insurance prices. The results indicated that small and medium-sized employers’ insurance prices are sensitive to tax price of insurance. The study also features a comprehensive literature analysis from trusted sources, which shines light on the topic of concern. Its theoretical conceptualization of the paper makes it a valid source towards the contribution of the present topic. Lastly, the authors utilized accurate procedures and tools like NBER’s TAXISM software to impute tax prices, which validate the study.

Black, B., Espin-Sanchez, J., French, E. & Litvak, K. (2017, July 28). The long-term effect of health insurance on near-elderly health and mortality. American Journal of Health Economics, 3(3), 281-311. Retrieved from https://www.mitpressjournals.org/doi/full/10.1162/ajhe_a_00076

Black et al. conducted a study to investigate the long-term effects of health insurance on mortality and health care utilization among the nearly elderly (between ages 50 and 61) in America. The longitudinal study, which lasted 20 years (1992 to 2012) revealed that the uninsured population accessed health services less frequently than their insured counterparts. Also, there were no significant differences realized between death rates among the insured and the uninsured. The researchers begin by providing a clear introduction and a literature review, which provides sufficient background information of the study topic. Procedures like sampling, estimation, and presentation of the findings are done professionally to ensure proper understanding of the study. Therefore, the study qualifies as a valid contribution towards the issues of contemporary health or public health policy.

Dunn, A & Shapiro, A.H. (2019, Feb 4). Does Medicare Part D save lives? American Journal of Health Economics, 5(1), 126-164. Retrieved from https://www.mitpressjournals.org/doi/full/10.1162/ajhe_a_00107

The above research investigated the impact of Medicare Part D on the mortality rate among populations over 65 years old. The researchers first identified drug coverage variations in the country before the implementation of Medicare. Later, mortality rates shortly before and after the implementation of the program was studied. The findings indicated a significant decrease in cardiovascular-related mortalities in the counties where Medicare part D is prevalent. First, the team clearly introduces the topic and state the problem being examined. The literature analysis section incorporates works of scholars from universities, the health industry, and private research organizations, which validates the paper. Additionally, the paper is clear and free of ambiguities since paragraphs are professionally arranged, the message is clearly conveyed, and there is flow of information throughout the paper. Data was obtained from the Medicare current Beneficiary Survey (MCBS) of 8 years and CDC, which provided mortality data of 10 years. Measurements were done using accurate formulas and the findings presented using texts, numerical, graphs, and tables. The paper, therefore, is a relevant source of the current topic.

Fout, B.T. & Gilleskie, B.D. (2015, May 14). Does health insurance encourage or crowd out beneficial nonmedical care? A dynamic analysis of insurance, health inputs, and health production. American Journal of Health Economics, 1(2), 125-164. Retrieved from https://www.mitpressjournals.org/doi/full/10.1162/AJHE_a_00010

Fout & Gilleskie examined the impact of health insurance on the price of non-medical care. The study focused specifically on diabetic individuals and their decisions to track, treat, and manage the condition. The sample involved nonelderly diabetics from the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey and the results linked better adherence to diabetic care guidelines to health insurance with drug coverage. The paper portrays rigor research of the topic including health insurance and health inputs, health insurance and health outcomes, and diabetes. Further, the theoretical framework, alongside the use of valid references makes the work a credible source for scholarly reference. Data is analyzed professionally and the results are presented using texts and tables. Also, the researchers interpret the results to communicate the logic of the findings in connection to the topic of discussion. Lastly, the findings of the study are verifiable, which allows for generalizability and, therefore, the study makes credible contribution towards issues related to contemporary health and public policy.

References

Abouk, R. & Adams, A. (2017, Jan 31). Compliance inspections of tobacco retailers and youth smoking. American Journal of Health Economics, 3(1), 10-32. Retrieved from https://www.mitpressjournals.org/doi/full/10.1162/AJHE_a_00065

Abraham, J.M., Feldman, R. & Graven, P. (2016, July 8). Employers’ changing economic incentives to offer health insurance under the Affordable Care Act. American Journal of Health Economics, 2(3), 273-299. Retrieved from https://www.mitpressjournals.org/doi/full/10.1162/AJHE_a_00045

Black, B., Espin-Sanchez, J., French, E. & Litvak, K. (2017, July 28). The long-term effect of health insurance on near-elderly health and mortality. American Journal of Health Economics, 3(3), 281-311. Retrieved from https://www.mitpressjournals.org/doi/full/10.1162/ajhe_a_00076

Dunn, A & Shapiro, A.H. (2019, Feb 4). Does Medicare Part D save lives? American Journal of Health Economics, 5(1), 126-164. Retrieved from https://www.mitpressjournals.org/doi/full/10.1162/ajhe_a_00107

Fout, B.T. & Gilleskie, B.D. (2015, May 14). Does health insurance encourage or crowd out beneficial nonmedical care? A dynamic analysis of insurance, health inputs, and health production. American Journal of Health Economics, 1(2), 125-164. Retrieved from https://www.mitpressjournals.org/doi/full/10.1162/AJHE_a_00010