Annotated Bibliography Paper on Lost Colony of Roanoke

Lost Colony of Roanoke: Annotated Bibliography

Donegan, Kathleen. “What Happened in Roanoke: Ralph Lane’s Narrative Incursion.” Early American Literature 48, no. 2 (2013): 285-314.

The article establishes that through writing the incursion, the anarchy sector turns out to be evident in a manner that it cannot with respect to a colonial catalog. The mode of information collection employed enables the easy change of experience into objects that may be gathered, classified, and defined. The colonial administrator and the person selected to provide a vivid description of the colony has to make efforts not just to recall clearly the occurrences, people, and situations that usually stay incoherent but also to link them to each other in a reasoned, coherent story. The author of the article, Kathleen Donegan, is an expert in the field having joined the University of California after obtaining a PhD at Yale University. Donegan concentrates in early American literature starting from the period of exploration to early Republic. This article will be used to show that regardless of the purposeful silence concerning its final times, the dreaded break out of the first colony from Virginia left a lot in its aftermath.

Emery, Theo. “The Roanoke Island Colony: Lost, and Found?” New York Times. August 10, 2015. https://www.nytimes.com/2015/08/11/science/the-roanoke-colonists-lost-and-found.html.

The author asserts that for a long period, the Lost Colony of Roanoke has offered a strange sentiment to researchers of the US history. The most enticing indication in decades with regard to the circumstance of the Lost Colony was evident in 2012 following the British Museum re-examination of a coastal map concerning the basis of the First Colony. Amid other imaging approaches, X-ray spectroscopy disclosed that a patch concealed a four-sided red and blue star on the part of Albemarle Sound towards the west. That section, close to the bank of River Chowan, approximately matched with John White’s oblique orientation that was underscored in a statement that became apparent after his return to the colony. The New York Times could be the most reliable print source in America as all its authors are professionals. This source will be used to demonstrate that every proof that assists unlock the door to the enigma is imperative in understanding the Lost Colony of Roanoke.

Givens, Ron. “Will an Old Clue Lead to the Lost Colony?” American History 47, no.  4 (2012): 6.

The author states that the spot was not marked, and perhaps that is the rationale behind it taking over four centuries for one to make out a small region on an ancient map, which could tell where the renowned Lost Colony of Roanoke was situated in Virginia. The moment that the maker of the map and administrator of the area, John White, departed from the colony at around 1587 in a speedy endeavor to return supplies from England, he left more than 100 people. Attributable to being held up by battles involving Spain and England, the governor returned after three years and found nothing; there was no person, house, settlement, or properties, and he had no idea of the fate of the colony. This source is reputable since it has been peer reviewed and is recent. The article will be utilized to explain how the Colony of Roanoke was lost and the possibility of its being traced.

Horn, James. A Kingdom Strange: The Brief and Tragic History of the Lost Colony of Roanoke. New York: Basic Books, 2010.

The author affirms that in 1611, the Spanish ambassador made remarks that the Virginia colony provided attitudes of its short-term state hence posing minimal threat to having authority over the place; nonetheless, caution was in order. The book provides credibility to the evaluation of England’s goals by ensuring that the pursuit for the US water-course to Asia and the available treasures is at the core of a persuasive reevaluation of the colony and its association with Jamestown. This creates a lively and rigid account that has a great potential of varying the manner in which people mull over the Lost Colony of Roanoke and its historical implication. Being a historian and a doctor of philosophy, the author is well-versed in his field. This book is useful for the project as it elucidates the colonization of Roanoke and the occurrence that followed in a striking account that appeals to scholars and the wider readership.

La Vere, David. “The 1937 Chowan River” Dare Stone”: A Re-evaluation.” The North Carolina Historical Review 86, no. 3 (2009): 251-281.

The author shows how for some time between 1930 and 1940 North Carolina came in the spotlight of global attention. It appeared that the proof that had been sought for a long time concerning the Lost Colony of Roanoke had at last been revealed. John White had the notion that the over one hundred people that he had left had made an arranged relocation from the region but could not tell where they had gone. It later became evident that the people had left messages to White in the form of stone carvings as they were convinced that he would come looking for them. On one of the rocks, there were names of the people who had died in the attack, and it was positioned on a hill where they had been buried. The historical analysis provided in the article is strongly laced with assumptions as it depends on stone carvings that are subject to controversies as there is no means of establishing their authenticity. La Vere has written many publications on American history and is currently a teacher and a researcher. This article is valuable in the project as it offers a credible account that corresponds with the details left regarding the Lost Colony of Roanoke.

 

 

 

Bibliography

Donegan, Kathleen. “What Happened in Roanoke: Ralph Lane’s Narrative Incursion.” Early American Literature 48, no. 2 (2013): 285-314.

Emery, Theo. “The Roanoke Island Colony: Lost, and Found?” New York Times. August 10, 2015. https://www.nytimes.com/2015/08/11/science/the-roanoke-colonists-lost-and-found.html.

Givens, Ron. “Will an Old Clue Lead to the Lost Colony?” American History 47, no.  4 (2012): 6.

Horn, James. A Kingdom Strange: The Brief and Tragic History of the Lost Colony of Roanoke. New York: Basic Books, 2010.

La Vere, David. “The 1937 Chowan River” Dare Stone”: A Re-evaluation.” The North Carolina Historical Review 86, no. 3 (2009): 251-281.