How the Bible Is Unified in Nature and What the Unity Accomplishes

How the Bible Is Unified in Nature and What the Unity Accomplishes

The Bible is without a doubt a unique book among all the books that have ever been written. In essence, contrary to what people say, the Bible is not a book but a collection of 66 books with different messages to readers (Preus, 1990). The Bible itself addresses an array of goals, topic, and is divided into four major plot movements of creation, fall, redemption, and restoration. The Bible’s uniqueness is further highlighted by its unified nature. This paper gives an explanation of how the Bible is unified in nature and what thus unity accomplishes.

As already mentioned, the Bible is a collection of 66 books and has been written by several human authors. It should be noted that while there are several authors through which the text was written, there is a single divine author who is God, and this explains how the it is unified in nature. There is not even a single humanly produced book any where in the world that contains the kind of unity the Bible contains. The Bible’s unified nature is further highlighted in the fact that it does not contradict itself like other books written by several authors (Preus, 1990). Instead, the Bible gives a consistent message or theme from the time of creation through revelation. It hardly contradicts itself in the conveyance of God’s message and presents a progression of theology that could not have evolved from men’s imagination. Most of the specific themes and theological concepts found in the early Old Testament are in their infancy stages and they are further developed in the later sections of the Old Testament and completed in the New Testament without inconsistency or contradiction. This level of unity serves the purpose of strengthening humans’ belief in the word of God as well as the relationship between humans and God.

One of the theological beliefs or doctrines presented in the Bible is that God is a perfect planner. Despite the fact that the Bible is written in different times and contexts, all its authors convey the same message about the eternal plan of God that begins at the time of creation to the flood during the time of Noah to the work of Christ on the Cross and to the consummation of the plan (Menn, Div, & Africa, 2009). The fact that God is a perfect planner is stated by Moses and other prophets in the Old Testament. In the New Testament, Jesus Christ as well as his apostles and disciples talk about a perfect planner God is. The Bible describes God as a planner in Genesis 1: 1 where it states that “In the beginning God created the heavens and the earth.” These sentiments are also shared in John 1:3 that states that “By God were all things made.” Moreover, the fact that God is a planner is evident in how he directed Noah to build the ark and created a flood that took all sinners away as described by the Bible in Genesis 7:17. Another theological belief presented in the Bible is that God is love as described in 1st John 4:8. Of course, this perspective can be interpreted by looking at God’s character and actions. After man was put into the Garden of Eden to take control over other creatures, he went ahead to sin against the wishes of God. However, because of love, God made efforts to save and restore man from sin through the death of his son Jesus Christ.

In a nutshell, as discussed above, the Bible is irrefutably a unique book among all books ever written given its unified nature. The unified nature is seen in the fact that the Bible conveys a consistent message throughout despite being written by many different authors. This is a level of unity than cannot be seen in other humanly produced books. Besides, there is a consistency in the theological beliefs of concepts conveyed such as that God is love and that he is a perfect planner. This level of unity serves the purpose of strengthening humans’ belief in the word of God as well as the relationship between humans and God.

 

 

References

Menn, J. M., Div, M., & Africa, E. C. L. E. (2009). Biblical Theology. Retrieved from http://www.eclea.net/books/bibl_theology.pdf

Preus, R. D. (1990). The Unity of Scripture. Concordia Theological Quarterly54, 1-23. Retrieved from https://pdfs.semanticscholar.org/926d/21e43a6a65ee8b60d7d31eff2f446576b401.pdf