Religious Studies Paper on The Sacred Text of Lao Zi

The Sacred Text of Lao Zi

In the TaoTe Ching, also known as the sacred text, Lao Zi’s contemplation of the harmony of nature inspires him to apply its free, still and noncompetitive character to illustrate his thinking about learning and good governance. Firstly, he notes that just as nature does not strive to prove itself, learning and good governance should not result into desire. Zi advices people to renounce their learning in order to end the noxious passion it brings. Also, he states that good governance will only be achieved if freedom is allowed to reign, just as nature makes everything perfect without being compelled (Max, 1886).

Secondly, Zi endorses the stillness of nature as a point of reference for his thinking about learning and good governance. He insists that the students should manage their business without doing anything, and communicate without having to talk. On good governance; he insists that keeping still will help the society to transform and follow the right path. He relates these scenarios to the way nature perfectly fulfills its purpose in quietness.

Next, by considering the noncompetitive character of nature, Zi proposes that learning and good governance should not result into rivalry. He, therefore, terms a humble learner as full of wisdom, because of ability to prevent rivalry. Moreover, Zi discourages the worship of men with superior in governance. He explains that doing so will only lead to desire to acquire such status (Max, 1886).

In conclusion, Zi has applied the free, still and noncompetitive way of nature into his thinking about learning and good governance. He has, therefore, proved that just like nature, learning and good governance do not necessarily result into rivalry and struggle.

 

 

References

Müller, Max (1886). Daoism: The Classic of the Way and Virtue (500s-400s BCE). The Sacred Books of the East. Oxford Clarendon Press.