Sample History Paper on The Cold War

The Cold War is one of the longest historical conflicts that took place in the 20th century. The war began shortly after World War 2 when the United States together with its allies as well as the Soviet Union and its satellite states started a fight for the supremacy. The name “Cold War” originated from the period when the tension between the Soviet Union and the United States was incredibly high but the two nations never resulted into a war, mostly due to the fear of nuclear escalation.[1] There are several factors that were responsible for the Second World War. Differences between the United States of America and Soviet Russia led to the occurrence of the war. The United States of America could not stand the communist ideology of Soviet Russia. The communist ideologists wanted to eliminate the privatization of properties and instead, create a centralized and planned economy. On the other hand, the Russians could not tolerate the ascendancy of the United States upon other European Nations.

During the first phase of the Cold War that took place from 1946-1949, the Soviet Russia and America disbelieved each other. America had attempted to control the Red Regime in Russia and as a result, the Russians developed the communist ideology by getting rid of democracy in Yugoslavia, Hungary, Rumania, Bulgaria, Poland, and other European nations. With the determination of reducing Russia`s hegemony, America gave assistance to Turkey, Greece and other Western European Nations. The second phase of the Cold War took place between1949 and1953 when a treaty known as ANZUS was signed between America, New Zealand, and Australia. To condense the effect of the Soviet Communism, a huge amount of dollars were spent by the Americans in the propaganda. Contrariwise, Soviet Russia attempted to equalize America by testing the Atom Bomb.[2]

The war continued up to the seventh phase, which took place in 1979-1987. Several changes were noticed in this phase where the Russian President Brezhnev and the American President Carter signed a SALT II, in an attempt of stopping the Cold War. The issues faced by Afghanistan, Ethiopia, Angola, and Vietnam benefited Russia, a phenomenon that annoyed America. It is unfortunate that open diplomacy as well as human rights, which had been proposed by the American President Carter, was criticized by Russia.[3] The Cold War involving Russia and America continued till 1987.

The theory that best explains the Cold War is the realism theory. It states that nations, organizations, or enterprises will cooperate only when the situation at hand favors their interests. In the realism theory, some countries might have an interest in securing land or more resources, while other countries may desire to expand their own economic and political systems. Apparently, political analysts are normally afraid of the centralized type of authority, not unless the powers are derived from their own state. In the realism theory, the balance of power occurs when there is the use of force to preserve a decentralized system. However, the balancing of power only occurs when there is an agreement between the major states.[4] In the context of the Cold War, both America and Russia cooperated when the situation at hand favored their individual interests hence the argument that the realism theory best describes the Cold War.

 

 

Bibliography

Betts, Richard K., ed. Conflict after the Cold War: arguments on causes of war and peace. Taylor & Francis, 2017, https://books.google.co.ke/books?hl=en&lr=&id=rCUlDwAAQBAJ&oi=fnd&pg=PP1&dq=Betts,+R.+K.+(Ed.).+(2017).+Conflict+after+the+Cold+War:+arguments+on+the+causes+of+war+and+peace.+Taylor+%26+Francis.+&ots=ZWwUXX3HF4&sig=cEhGKFz2PLmDEkqq8Ff4P4E45SU&redir_esc=y

Dalby, Simon. Creating the second cold war: The discourse of politics. Bloomsbury Publishing, 2016.

Llewellyn, Karl. Jurisprudence: realism in theory and practice. Routledge, 2017.

[1] Betts, Richard K., ed. Conflict after the Cold War: arguments on causes of war and peace. Taylor & Francis, 2017

[2] Dalby, Simon. Creating the second cold war: The discourse of politics. Bloomsbury Publishing, 2016.

[3] Dalby, Simon, 24.

[4] Llewellyn, Karl. Jurisprudence: realism in theory and practice. Routledge, 2017.