Sample Political Science Paper on 2018 California Law Changes

Significant changes have been made to California’s law since the turn of the new year 2018. Most of the changes are aimed at improving the livelihoods of the residents of California as well as enabling better economic conditions in the state. Various articles explore these changes with a focus on whether they are of benefit to the state or not. This paper summarizes an article highlighting some of the new 2018 California law changes and further explains whether the law changes will or will not benefit California.

Summary of Article

In their article New California Laws -2018, Cabrera & Wong (2017) argue that since the beginning of 2018, several laws in California have been approved most of which have impacted residents directly or indirectly. They highlight some of the laws such as that increasing the minimum wage by $11 per hour for individuals working in businesses with 26 employees or more, the law granting leave to new parents whereby businesses with 20 or more employees are required to grant eligible employees twelve weeks of protected job leave, the State-Wide Ban-the-Box law that applies to employers with more than five employees, and the law focusing on salary history where employers are prohibited from asking about the salary history of the applicant including information on benefits and compensations.

Whether the Law Changes will Benefit California

There is a law pushing for an increase in the minimum wage by $11 per hour for individuals working in businesses with 26 or more employees. Entities with 25 or fewer staffs are allowed to continue paying a minimum wage of $10.5 per working hour. The minimum wage law will have an impact on the salary basis of California law, which requires employees on leave to earn wages equivalent to not less than the stated minimum salary for a full-time employee. It will benefit California because an increase in the minimum wage will increase the productivity of the workers and help in the reduction of employee turnover in organizations. Economists also associate high wages with good mental and physical health and reduced decision fatigue leading to high productivity. The 2018 law granting leave to new parents requires businesses with 20 or more employees to grant eligible employees twelve weeks of protected job leave. The leave is meant to allow parents to bond with their newborn babies within the year of the child’s foster care placement, adoption, or birth (Cabrera & Wong, 2017). This law will benefit the residents of California as new parents will be able to focus more on upbringing the child during leave unlike before when there were numerous challenges in balancing work and caring for the newborn.

The State-Wide Ban-the-Box law, also called the AB 1008, applies to employers with more than five employees. It forbids employers from asking about criminal records during a job interview. It also prohibits employers from seeking an applicant’s criminal history unless a conditional offer has been made. An employer must then consider all the information presented by the applicant before making any final decision. This law will not benefit California because several people could be locked out during recruitment processes. With this law in place, several employers will not give preference to people with criminal records (Cabrera & Wong, 2017). The law on salary history prohibits employers from asking about the salary history of an applicant including information on benefits and compensations. It forbids employers from using the information of an applicant’s salary history to determine how much to pay an applicant or whether to employ them. However, in situations where the applicant freely discloses his or her salary history, an employer may use the information to decide on the amount of salary to be offered (Cabrera & Wong, 2017). This law will benefit California because it will prevent discrimination from the wage perspective.

Reference

Cabrera, K. M., & Wong, K. K. (2017, December 12). New California Laws – 2018. The National Law Review. Retrieved from https://www.natlawreview.com/article/new-california-laws-2018