SOWK 1103: HUMAN BEHAVIOR IN THE SOCIAL ENVIRONMENT

STOCKTON UNIVERSITY
SOWK 1103: HUMAN BEHAVIOR IN THE SOCIAL ENVIRONMENT

MASTER SYLLABUS

Term: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Classroom: Phone:
Office Hours:
Or by Appointment

COURSE DESCRIPTION

This course examines human development over the life span from a multidimensional perspective. Biological, psychological, sociological, and spiritual theories are used as frameworks from which to understand the interrelationship between human behavior and environmental contexts. The course focuses on developmental stages across the life span within the contexts of individual, family, groups, and communities. The intersectionality of diversity factors (i.e. social class, race, ethnicity, culture, gender, gender identity and expression, sexual orientation, religion, and disability status) is also addressed as important to students’ understanding of the person-in-environment interconnection.

Understanding human behavior in its environmental context is fundamental to effective social work practice. Although all human behavior is not always predictable, there are certain anticipated and commonly shared aspects that enhance our understanding of the human maturation process and the contextual environments in which this process occurs. This course aims to enhance students’ comprehension of the conceptual linkages between theories of human behavior, issues of diversity, and practice interventions grounded in a knowledge-base drawn from biological, psychological, sociological, and spiritual domains.

COURSE OBJECTIVES

COURSE OBJECTIVES
Below are salient practice behaviors associated with Program competencies covered in each of the following objectives. By the completion of the course students will be able to:

Competency 1: Demonstrate Ethical and Professional Behavior
• Demonstrate professional demeanor in behavior; appearance; and oral, written, and electronic communications
• Use reflection and self-regulation to manage personal values and maintain professionalism in practice situations

Competency 2: Engage Diversity and Difference in Practice
• Apply and communicate understanding of the importance of diversity and difference in shaping life experiences in practice at the micro and macro levels
• Present themselves as learners and engage clients and constituencies as experts in their own experiences

Competency 4: Engage in Practice-informed Research and Research-informed Practice
• Use and translate research findings to inform and improve practice, policy and service delivery

Competency 6: Engage with Individuals, Families, Groups Organizations, and Communities
• Apply knowledge of human behavior and the social environment and practice context to engage with clients and constituencies

Competency 7: Assess Individuals, Families, Groups, Organizations, and Communities
• Collect, organize, and critically analyze and interpret information from clients and constituencies
• Apply knowledge of human behavior and the social environment, person-in-environment, and other multidisciplinary theoretical frameworks in the analysis of assessment data from clients and constituencies

CLASS FORMAT

Varied classroom instructional methods will be used including lectures, media presentations, small group discussions, and guest speakers. Students will be held responsible for class material presented in all formats. There will be various opportunities for students to demonstrate their understanding of material in different ways.

TEXTS (Required)

Ashford, J. B., LeCroy, C. W. & Williams, L.R. (2017). Human behavior in the social environment: A multidimensional perspective. (6th ed.) Boston, MA: Cengage Learning.

UNDERGRADUATE SOCIAL WORK PROGRAM EXPECTATIONS

Professional Behavior: Students are responsible for understanding the NASW Code of Ethics (available at http://www.socialworkers.org) and for conducting themselves in accordance with its core values and principles—in the classroom as well as in the field. Students are also responsible for understanding and abiding by Stockton’s Academic Honesty Policy, which is fully explained on pages 110-114 of the Undergraduate Bulletin (2008-10).

The undergraduate social work program is focusing on preparing students for generalist social work practice with individuals, families, groups, and communities. This preparation begins in the classroom, where students will encounter other students and professors with diverse backgrounds, viewpoints, and perspectives on issues. It is expected that we treat each other with respect at all times and that we strive to understand and value diversity.

As a student preparing for a professional career, you are expected to come to every class and be prepared for active participation. This means doing required readings before classes, handing in assignments on time, and being attentive in class. Please be respectful of the environment within our communal classroom space. This also means assuring that there will be no disruptions. Do not leave class to get food! The use of cell phones (including text messaging), such as iPhone, Androids, PDAs, or of any similar type of electronic device are not permitted in class except for specific class exercises. Please turn all such devices off prior to class. Please inform the instructor in advance if there is a bona fide emergency requiring that you need to leave your cell phone on. Please turn it to “silent mode” and attend to the call in the hallway so that you will not disturb your colleagues. Also, please do not check email or browse online during class time if you are using a laptop. It might not take away from your own learning experience, but it very well could distract your classmates and the instructor. Students who are unable to attend class due to an emergency are expected to call the instructor and leave a voice mail message. Students who miss more than two classes put themselves at risk of substantial grade reduction.

Students with Special Needs
In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 as amended and Sections 504 and 508 of the Rehabilitation Act, students with a documented disability and need accommodations, are encouraged to register with the Learning Access Program (LAP). Registration for support services is strictly voluntary and on a confidential basis. Support services provided by LAP are meant to help students devise strategies for meeting the University’s educational demands and to foster independence, responsibility, and self-advocacy. The Learning Access Program can be found on campus in room J-204 or online at www.stockton.edu/LAP. Please call 609-652-4988 or send an email to LAP@stockton.edu for more information. Once you have received an accommodation letter from LAP, please contact your instructor to privately discuss your needs as soon as practical to ensure that reasonable accommodations are implemented.

Retroactive accommodations will not be granted.

ATTENDANCE
Students are expected to attend all classes on time and for the entire class period. They are also expected to actively participate in class discussions. Three late arrivals or early departures count as one absence. Students who have more than 3 absences and/or late arrivals or early departures will reduce their final course grade by 3 points for each absence over 3. (For example, if your course grade was a 91 and you had 4 absences, your final course grade would be reduced to an 88.) Three late arrivals or early departures are the equivalent of one absence. Notify the professor in advance to being absent If you are absolutely unable to attend class, must arrive late, or depart early. No distinction exists between an excused and unexcused absence, because all absences should have merit. Discerning what constitutes a true emergency is part of effective problem-solving.

Incomplete Grades
Do not ask for an incomplete grade in this course unless there are extreme circumstances for which you can provide documentation. The instructor must be notified as soon as the unanticipated circumstance develops. An incomplete grade will only be given if the following conditions are met:
a. The student is passing the course;
b. Course work can be completed without further class attendance;
c. Course work is unfinished because of death in the family, personal illness, accident, or other unavoidable circumstances directly related to the completion of an assignment. Documentation must be provided.

The professor must be notified as soon as the unanticipated circumstance develops.

Preparation and Participation
As a professional social worker, you will be expected to be reliable in attendance. Preparation for each encounter with a client system and for every professional meeting will also be expected. As a student preparing for a professional career, you are expected to come to every class and be prepared for active participation. This means doing required readings before classes, handing in assignments on time, and being attentive in class. Please be respectful of the environment within our communal classroom space. This means assuring that there will be no disruptions. Do not leave class to get food! The use of cell phones (including text messaging), such as iPhone, Androids, PDAs, or of any similar type of electronic device are not permitted in class. Please turn all such devices off prior to class. Please inform the instructor in advance if there is a bona fide emergency requiring that you need to leave your cell phone on. Please turn it to “silent mode” and attend to the call in the hallway so that you will not disturb your colleagues. Also, please do not check email or browse online during class time if you are using a laptop. It might not take away from your own learning experience, but it very well could distract your classmates and the instructor. Students who are unable to attend class due to an emergency are expected to call the instructor and leave a voice mail message. Students who miss more than two classes put themselves at risk of substantial grade reduction.
Students with Special Needs: In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 as amended and Sections 504 and 508 of the Rehabilitation Act, students with a documented disability and need accommodations, are encouraged to register with the Learning Access Program (LAP). Registration for support services is strictly voluntary and on a confidential basis. Support services provided by LAP are meant to help students devise strategies for meeting the University’s educational demands and to foster independence, responsibility, and self-advocacy. The Learning Access Program can be found on campus in room J-204 or online at www.stockton.edu/LAP. Please call 609-652-4988 or send an email to LAP@stockton.edu for more information. Once you have received an accommodation letter from LAP, please contact your instructor to privately discuss your needs as soon as practical to ensure that reasonable accommodations are implemented.

Academic Dishonesty
Plagiarism, scholastic dishonesty, and cheating are serious offenses. If a student commits any of the above noted actions, that student will receive an F for this course. Additionally, the student will be reported to the appropriate college entities for academic discipline. If you have any question about when and how to document sources, or any other question that will help you avoid unintentional plagiarism, please discuss your questions with me. (Please refer to the student handbook on Academic Integrity/Dishonesty.)
Examples of plagiarism include, but are not limited to:

• Neglecting to cite verbatim text;
• Neglecting to place verbatim text in quotation marks;
• Summarizing without citing the original source; and
• Paraphrasing without citing the original source.
Examples of dishonest conduct include, but are not limited to:
• Cheating on an examination or research paper by copying another student’s work;
• Using inappropriate notes or an unauthorized electronic device in a testing situation;
• Misrepresenting or falsifying documents; or
• Collaborating with another student on course work when not specifically authorized by the faculty member.
Examples of scholastic dishonesty
• Misrepresenting as your own work any part of work done by another
• Submitting the same paper or substantially similar papers to meet the requirements of more than one course without the written approval and consent of all instructors concerned;
• Depriving another student of necessary course materials; interfering with another’s work.

ASSIGNMENTS Percentage of Total Grade

1. Three Quizzes (10% each) 30%
2. Infant/Early Childhood Case Study 20%
3. Oral Group Presentation 15%
4. Self-Portrait Reflection Paper 10%
5. Self-Portrait Presentation 10%
6. Class Participation and Take-Home Assignments 15%

Grading
A= 100-94, A- = 93-90, B+ =89-86, B = 85-84, B- = 83-80, C+ = 79-76, C = 75-74, C- = 73-70, D+ = 69-66, D = 65-64, D- = 63-60, F = 59 & below

Students are given ample notification concerning assignment due dates. Therefore, all assignments are due by the date/time posted. A late assignment will lose 10% for each day it is late. All assignments are submitted through Turnitin to verify the originality of each student’s work.

Students are expected to maintain high standards of academic integrity spelled out by the University which includes working independently, properly citing references, submitting original work (not work written for another course) and not plagiarizing.

Effective writing skills are fundamental to professional practice. Proper grammar, syntax, spelling, and appropriate referencing style APA, (Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association,) are expected for all assignments. Up to ten percent (10%) of the grade on a writing assignment will be deducted for serious writing, spelling, and referencing errors. If you have problems with writing, PLEASE SEEK HELP from the Writing Skills Center. https://intraweb.stockton.edu/eyos/page.cfm?siteID=70&pageID=2

CALENDAR

(The calendar is subject to changes in response to class needs and the instructor’s discretion. Students are responsible to keep up with the changes.)

Week 1:
INTRODUCTION AND OVERVIEW

Topic 1
Introduction to Human Behavior in the Social Environment: Why Do Social Workers Study Human Behavior and the Social Environment

Readings
Ashford, J. B., LeCroy, C. W. & Williams, L.R. (2017). Human Behavior in the
Social Environment: A Multidimensional Perspective. (6th ed.) (pp. 1-39). Boston,
MA: Cengage Learning
Week 2:

Topic 2: An Integrative Multidimensional Framework

Readings
Ashford, J. B., LeCroy, C. W. & Williams, L.R. (2017). Human Behavior in the
Social Environment: A Multidimensional Perspective. (6th ed.) (pp. 40-69).
Boston, MA: Cengage Learning

Week 3:

Topic 3: Humanistic and Existential Perspectives

Readings
MacKinlay, Elizabeth. (2001). Religion, faith and spirituality. In spiritual dimension of ageing. London: Jessica Kingsley.

Hodge, D. R. (2001). Spiritual genograms: A generational approach to assessing spirituality. Families in Society, 82(1), 35-48.

Week 4:

Topic 4: Pregnancy, Birth and the Newborn

Readings
Ashford, J. B., LeCroy, C. W. & Williams, L.R. (2017). Human Behavior in the
Social Environment: A Multidimensional Perspective. (6th ed.) (pp. 70-117).
Boston, MA: Cengage Learning

February 5th: Group Presentation – Pregnancy, Birth and the Newborn

– Quiz 1 – On: Weeks 1 – 2 – 3

Week 5:

Topic 5: Topic 5: Infancy

Readings
Ashford, J. B., LeCroy, C. W. & Williams, L.R. (2017). Human Behavior in the
Social Environment: A Multidimensional Perspective. (6th ed.) (pp. 118-176).
Boston, MA: Cengage Learning

February 12th – Group Presentation – Infancy

Week 6:

Topic 6: Early Childhood

Readings
Ashford, J. B., LeCroy, C. W. & Williams, L.R. (2017). Human Behavior in the
Social Environment: A Multidimensional Perspective. (6th ed.) (pp. 177-235).
Boston, MA: Cengage Learning

Week 7:

Early Childhood Case Study Due

Topic 7: Middle Childhood

Readings
Ashford, J. B., LeCroy, C. W. & Williams, L.R. (2017). Human Behavior in the
Social Environment: A Multidimensional Perspective. (6th ed.) (pp. 236-282).
Boston, MA: Cengage Learning

February 26th – Group Presentation – Middle Childhood

Week 8:

On: Pregnancy, Birth & the Newborn, Infancy, Early Childhood,
& Middle Childhood

Topic 8: Topic 8: Adolescence

Readings
Ashford, J. B., LeCroy, C. W. & Williams, L.R. (2017). Human Behavior in the
Social Environment: A Multidimensional Perspective. (6th ed.) (pp. 283-347).
Boston, MA: Cengage Learning

– Group Presentation – Adolescence

Week 9:

Topic 8: Adolescence (continued)

Week 10:

Topic 9: Emerging and Young Adulthood

Readings
Ashford, J. B., LeCroy, C. W. & Williams, L.R. (2017). Human Behavior in the
Social Environment: A Multidimensional Perspective. (6th ed.) (pp. 348-401).
Boston, MA: Cengage Learning

– Group Presentation – Emerging and Young Adulthood

Topic 10: Middle Adulthood

Readings
Ashford, J. B., LeCroy, C. W. & Williams, L.R. (2017). Human Behavior in the
Social Environment: A Multidimensional Perspective. (6th ed.) (pp. 402-451).
Boston, MA: Cengage Learning

– Group Presentation-Middle Adulthood

Week 12:

Topic 10: Middle Adulthood

Readings
Ashford, J. B., LeCroy, C. W. & Williams, L.R. (2017). Human Behavior in the
Social Environment: A Multidimensional Perspective. (6th ed.) (pp. 402-451).
Boston, MA: Cengage Learning

Week 13:

Topic 11: Late Adulthood and Very Late Adulthood

Readings
Ashford, J. B., LeCroy, C. W. & Williams, L.R. (2017). Human Behavior in the
Social Environment: A Multidimensional Perspective. (6th ed.) (pp. 452-506).
Boston, MA: Cengage Learning
– Quiz 3 – On Adolescence, Emerging & Young Adulthood & Middle Adulthood

Week 14:

Topic 11: Late Adulthood and Very Late Adulthood (cont’d)

– Older Adult Self Portrait Presentations

Week 15:

Course wrap-up

– Older Adult Self Portrait Presentations (cont’d)
BIBLIOGRAPHY

Infancy and Children

Bensen, P. L. (1997). All Kids our Kids: What Communities Must Do to Raise Caring and Responsible Children and Adolescents. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

Thackray, H., & Tifft, C. (2001). Fetal alcohol syndrome. Pediatric Review, 22, 47-55.

Scher, A., & Mayseless, O. (2000). Mothers of anxious/ambivalent infants: Maternal characteristics and child-care context. Child Development, 71(6), 1629-1639.

Schneider, B. H., Atkinson, L., & Tardif, C. (2001). Child-parent attachment and children’s peer relations: A qualitative review. Developmental Psychology, 37, 86-100.

Kvarfordt, C. L., & Sheridan, M. J. (2007). The role of religion and spirituality in working with children and adolescents: Results of a national survey. Journal of Religion & Spirituality in Social Work, 26(3), 1-23.

Kwalombota, M. (2002). The effect of pregnancy in HIV-infected women. AIDS Care, 14(3), 431-433.

Chiriboga, C. A., Burst, J. C. M., Bateman, D., & Hauser, W. A. (1999). Dose-response effect of fetal cocaine exposure on newborn neurologic function. Pediatrics, 103, 79-85.

Gender Issues

Belle, D., & Doucet, J. (2003). Poverty, inequality, and discrimination as sources of depression among U.S. women. Psychology of Women Quarterly, 27(2), 1001-113.

Carli, L. L., & Eagly, A. H. (2001). Gender, hierarchy, and leadership: An introduction. Journal of Social Issues, 57(4), 629-636.

Gibelman, M. (2003). So how far have we come? Pestilent and persistent gender gap in pay. Social Work, 48(1), 22-32.

Herek, G. M. (2001). On heterosexual masculinity: Some psychical consequences of the social construction of gender and sexuality. American Behavioral Scientist, 29(5), 563-577.

Reimer, M. S. (1983). Gender differences in moral judgment: The state of the art. Smith College Studies in Social Work, 54(1), 1-12.

Jaffee, S. & Hyde, J. S. (2000). Gender differences in moral orientation: A meta-analysis. Psychological Bulletin, 126, 703-726.

Theoretical Approaches

Bertalanffy, L. von. (1972). The history of general systems theory. In G. J. Klir (Ed.), Trends in General Systems Theory (pp. 21-41). New York: Wiley-Interscience.

Blundo, R. (2001). Learning strengths based practice: Challenging our personal and professional frames. Families in Society, 82(3), 296-304.

Bronfenbrenner, U. (1979). The ecology of Human Development. Cambridge, Ma: Harvard University Press.

Donovan, J. (1994). Feminist Theory: The Intellectual Tradition of American Feminism. New York: Continuum.

Dahrendorf, R. (1958). Toward a theory of social conflict. Journal of Conflict resolution, 2(June), 170-183.

Dweck, C. S. (2000). Self Theories: Their Role in Motivation, Personality, and Development. New York: Psychological Press.

Ginsberg, L., Nackerud, L., & Larrison, C. R. (2004). Human Biology for Social Workers: Development, Ecology, Genetics, and Health. Boston: Pearson.

Johnson, H. C., Atkins, S. P., Battle, S. F., Hernandez-Arata, L., Hesselbrock, M., Libassi, M. F., & Parish, M. S. (1990). Strengthening the “bio” in the biopsychosocial paradigm. Journal of Social Work Education, 26(2), 109-123.

Kohlberg, L. (1969). Stages in the Development of Moral Thought and Action. New York: Holt, Rinehart, & Winston.

Northcut, T. B. (2000). Constructing a place for religion and spirituality in psychodynamic practice. Clinical Social Work Journal, 28(2), 155–169.

Saleeby, D. (2006). The strengths approach to practice. In The Strengths Perspective in Social Work Practice. (4th ed.). Boston: Pearson Education.

Saleeby, D. (2006). The strengths perspective: Possibilities and problems. In The Strengths Perspective in Social Work Practice. (4th ed.). Boston: Pearson Education.

Merton, R. K. (1968). Social Theory and Social Structure. New York: Free press.

Wink, P., & Dillon, M. (2002). Spiritual development across the adult life course: Findings from a longitudinal study. Journal of Adult Development, 9, 79-94.

Weinreich, P. (2003). Identity structural analysis. In P. Weinreich & Saunderson (Eds.), Analyzing Identity: Cross-cultural, societal, and clinical contexts (pp. 1-76). London: Routledge Taylor & Francis.

Multicultural Issues

Craig, A. P., & Beishuizen, J. J. (2002). Psychological testing in a multicultural society: Universal or particular competencies? Intercultural Education, 13(2), 201-213.

Cultural Competence Standards for Social Work Practice http://www.socialworkers.org/sections/credentials/cultural_comp.asp

Devore, W., & Schlesinger, E. G. (1999). Ethnic-sensitive Social Work Practice. (5th ed). Boston: Allyn & Bacon.

Fellin, P. (Spring/Summer, 2000). Revisiting multiculturalism in social work. Journal of Social Work Education, 36(2), 261-278.

Fong, R., Spickard, P. R., & Ewalt, P. L. (1995). A multiracial reality: Issues for social work. Social Work,40(6), 725-727.

Gray-Little, B., & Hafdahl, A. R. (2000). Factors influencing racial comparisons of self-esteem: A quantitative review. Psychological Bulletin, 126, 26-54.

Harkness, S. (1990). A cultural model for the acquisition of language: Implications for the innateness debate. Developmental Psychobiology, 23, 727-739.

Race – The Power of an Illusion (2003) (Video).

Schaefer, R. T. (2006). Hispanic Americans. In Racial and ethnic groups (10th ed., 234-239). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson Prentice Hall.

Middle Childhood

America’s Children: Key National Indicators of Well-Being. (2007). Retrieved February 1, 2008, from http://www.childstats.gov/americaschildren/edu.asp

Bergin, D. (1988). Stages of play development. In D. Bergin (Ed.), Play as a medium for learning and development. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann.

Bifulco, A., Moran, P. M., Ball, C., Jacobs, C., Baines, R., Bunn, A., & Cavagin, J. (2002). Childhood adversity, parental vulnerability and disorder: Examining intergenerational transmission of risk. Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, 43(8), 1075-1086.

Bronstein, P., & Clauson, J. (1993). Parenting behavior and children’s social, psychological, and academic adjustment in diverse family structures. Family Relations, 42, 268-276.

Funk, J. B., Buchman, D. D., Jenks, J., & Bechtoldt, H. (2002, November). An evidence-based approach to examining the impact of playing violent video and computer games. Simile.

Leon, K. (2003). Risk and protective factors in young children’s adjustment to parental divorce: A review of the research. Family Relations, 52, 258-270.

Adolescence

Bryan, A., & Stalling, M. C. (2002). A case control study of adolescent risky sexual behavior and its relationship to personality dimensions, conduct disorder, and substance use. Journal of Youth and Adolescence, 31(5), 387-396.

Cantor, J. (2000). Media violence. Journal of Adolescent Health, 27(2), 30-34.

Messner, M. (2007). Masculinities and athletic careers. In Andersen, L., & Collins, P.H. Race, Class, and Gender: An Anthology (6th ed.) (pp. 172-184). Belmont, CA: Thomson.

Fraser, M. W. (1996). Aggressive behavior in childhood and early adolescence: An ecological developmental perspective on youth violence. Social Work, 41(4), 347-361.

Gilligan, C. (1993). In a Different Voice: Psychological Theory and Women’s Development. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.

Habermas, T, & Bluck, S. (2000). Getting a life: The emergence of the life story in adolescence. Psychological Bulletin, 126, 748-769.

Kvarfordt, C. L., & Sheridan, M. J. (2007). The role of religion and spirituality in working with children and adolescents: Results of a national survey. Journal of Religion & Spirituality in Social Work, 26(3), 1-23.

Zaider, T. I., Johnson, J. G., & Cockell, S. J. (2002). Psychiatric disorders associated with the onset and persistence of bulimia nervosa and binge eating disorder during adolescence. Journal of Youth and Adolescence, 31(5), 319-329.

Young Adulthood

Amott, T., & Mattheai, J. (2007) Race, class, gender and women’s work. In Andersen, L., & Collins, P.H. Race, Class, and Gender: An Anthology (6th ed.) (pp. 283-292). Belmont, CA: Thomson.

Harvey, A. R., & Hill, R. B. (2004). Africentric youth and family rites of passage program: promoting resilience among at risk African American Youth. Social Work, 49(1), 65-74.

Jones, L. V. (2004). Enhancing psychosocial competence among Black women in college. Social Work, 49(1), 75-84.

White, P. (2002). Access to health care: Health insurance considerations for young adults with special health care needs/disabilities. Pediatrics, 110(6), 1328-1335.

Levesque, M., Nave, C., and Lowe, C. (2006). Toward an understanding of gender differences in inferring sexual interest. Psychology of Women Quarterly, 30, 150-8.

Haws, W. A., & Mallinckrodt, B. (1998). Separation-individuation from family of origin and marital adjustment of recently married couples. American Journal of Family Therapy, 26(4), 293-306.

Wachs, T. D. (2000). Necessary but not sufficient: The respective roles of single and multiple influences on individual development. Washington, DC: American Psychological Association.

Middle Adulthood

North American Menopause Society. (2003). Menopause guidebook: Helping women make informed health-care decisions through perimenopause and beyond. Cleveland, OH: Author.

Wang, H., & Amato. (2000). Predictors of divorce adjustment: Stressors, resources, and definitions. Journal of Marriage and the Family, 62(3), 655-668.

Crowley, B. J., Hayslip, B., & Hobdy, J. (2003). Psychological hardiness and adjustment to life events in adulthood. Journal of Adult Development, 10(4), 237-248.

Gibelman, M. (2003). So how far have we come? Pestilent and persistent gender gap in pay. Social Work, 48(1), 22-32.

Black, P., & Balcazar, F. (2007). “Race, poverty and disability: Three strikes and you’re out! Or are you?” In Andersen, L., & Collins, P.H. Race, Class, and Gender: An Anthology (6th ed.) (pp. 426-432). Belmont, CA: Thomson.

May, G. E. (2005). Changing the future of disability: The disability discrimination model. In G. E. May, & M. B. Raske, M. B. (Eds.) Ending disability discrimination: Strategies for social workers (pp. 82-98). Boston: Allyn & Bacon.

Wingert, P and Kantrowitz, B. (2006). Is it hot in here or is it me? In The complete guide to menopause. New York: Workman Publishing.

Families

Cherlin, A. J., & Furstenberg, F. F. (1994). Stepfamilies in the United States: A reconsideration. In J. Blake & J. Hagen (Eds.) Annual review of sociology. Palo Alto, CA: Annual Reviews.

Minuchin, P. (1985). Families and individual development: Provocations from the field of family therapy. Child Development, 56, 289-302.

Golombok, S. (2002). Adoption by lesbian couples. British Medical Journal, 324(7351), 1407-1409.

Danis, F. (2003). Social work response to domestic violence: Encouraging news from a new look. Affilia 18(2), 177-191.

Baumrind, D. (1968). Authoritarian vs. authoritative parental control. Adolescence, 3(11), 255-272.

Haight, W. L., Kagle, J. D., & Black, J. E. (2003). Understanding and supporting parent-child relationships during foster care visits: Attachment theory and research. Social Work, 48(2), 195-209.

Older Adults

Chapman, D. G., & Toseland, R. W. (2007). Effectiveness of advanced illness care teams for nursing home residents with dementia. Social Work, 52(4), 321-329.

Conwell, Y., Duberstein, P. R., Cox, C., Herrman, J., Forbes, N., & Caine, E. (1998). Age differences in behaviors leading to completed suicide. American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, 6(2), 122-126.

Moody, H. R. (1998). Cross-cultural geriatrics ethics: Negotiating our differences. Generations, 22(3), 32-40.

Kahana, E., & Kahana, B. (2003). Contextualizing successful aging: New directions in an age-old search. In R. Settersten, Jr. (Ed.), Invitation to the life course: A new look at old age. Amityville, NY: Baywood Publishing.

LoboPraabhu, S., Mollinari, V., Arlinghaus, K., Barr, E., and Lomax, J. (2005). Spouses of patients with dementia: How do they stay together ‘till death do us part’? Journal of Gerontological Social Work, 44, 161-174.

Phillips, R. L., and Slaughter, J.R. (2000). Depression and sexual desire. American Family Physician, 64, 782-6.

Potts, A., Gavey, N., Grace, V. M., & Vares, T. (2003). The downside of Viagra: Women’s experiences and concerns. Sociology of Health and Illness, 25, 697-719.

Loue, S. (2005). Intimacy and institutionalized cognitive impaired elderly. Care Management Journals, 6, 185-190.

Martin, D., and Lyon, P. (2001). Positively gay: New approaches to gay and lesbian life. In B. Berzon (Ed.), Positively gay: New approaches to gay and lesbian life. Berkeley, CA: Celestial Arts.
ASSIGNMENTS

1. Quizzes
Will cover readings, lectures, and presentations. Each quiz will consist of multiple-choice questions. In the event of an unavoidable absence that keeps you from coming to class on quiz day, you may make up one (1) quiz only. Please discuss arrangements for a make-up quiz (time and place) with your professor. This is the only quiz make-up opportunity that exists; so please plan to be present on all scheduled quiz dates. If you know in advance of an absence on a quiz day, you can make arrangements with me to take the quiz prior to the scheduled class quiz day.

2. Homework/attendance/class participation
You are expected to attend all classes and be on time. Your relevant contributions to class discussions reflecting required readings and assignments are expected. Turning in short assignments is also expected. Regular attendance is required.

3. Case study

This assignment affords you the opportunity to observe an infant/child in his or her naturalistic setting, apply relevant theoretical concepts learned in class, and critique the theory or theories from which you obtained concepts.
1. Choose an infant/child who is accessible to you. However, do not use your own infant/child or sibling because it is too difficult to be objective when observing immediate family members. Extended family members, for example cousins, are acceptable.
2. Before beginning your observations, read the information in the text chapters as well as the readings that apply to the age group to which the infant/child belongs. Additionally, make sure to read about biological, spiritual, and diversity issues as well issues related to families, groups, and communities that may apply to your infant/child. This will help you identify the child’s physical changes, his/her social behaviors, and cognitive and psychological functioning.
Collecting your Data
Gain permission from adult(s) responsible for the infant/child. Inform them that your observation is for a class project and not an evaluation, but rather an observation to help you correlate the relationship between theoretical knowledge and actual child development. Please emphasize that this is not an evaluation of the infant/child and that the name of the infant/child will not be in the report.
Methods to gather information:
• Naturalistic observation: There should be two separate 30-minute observation periods. Try to be as unobtrusive as possible. During an observation, you are not there to play or interact with the infant/child – only observe. Write down what the infant/child does and others do with the infant/child. Focus on behavior rather than interpretation.
• Informal interaction: After one of the observations, spend a brief period interacting with the infant/child. Your goal is to discover the infant/child personality and language abilities. You may also interact with adult(s) responsible for the infant/child at this time.
Writing your report
After you have finished collecting your data, write a 7-8-page report including the following:
 Identifying Information: (Replace name with a pseudonym before submitting to instructor), age, sex, race/ethnic group, socioeconomic status of the family, religion, and relationship of the infant/child to student.
 Include a physical description of the infant/child.
 Current household and housing situation of the infant/child
 Identify social systems in which the child lives and how these systems promote or deter her/him in maintaining or achieving well-being
 Health condition
 Does the infant/child have any history of physical or mental handicaps, hospitalizations or serious illness/injuries?
 The assignment is not intended to be a chronological description of your observations. Summarize and make inferences (hypotheses).
 Use examples of behavior to support your perceptions and hypotheses.
 Describe the biological, psychological, and social development of the child citing examples from your observations or interactions. The reader should be able to visualize the person physically, as well as behaviorally, by some of his/her behaviors and communication with others.
 Apply relevant theoretical concepts in your description of the behavior of the infant/child.
 Critique the theory or theories from which you used concepts in terms of biases and cultural limitations
 Conclude by providing a brief summary about the experience and your own reflections about this assignment.
The grade will be based on appropriate application of theoretical concepts, quality of expression, and adherence to the outline provided. This assignment is to be typed, MS Word, double spaced, 1” margins, font Times New Roman, size 12. You must add a cover page not counted as one of the pages to this assignment including your name, date and the course. Additionally, submit the raw data to the final report. (These are the original notes you took during the interview and observations.)
Note: Use APA style for all references including the bibliography (References) at the end of the paper. Any assertion or claim must have a citation. Correct grammar and spelling is expected.

Oral group presentation
Each presentation (35-45 minutes) should identify and discuss environmental influences on human behavior regarding a specific topic area. You should select one specific social/behavioral issue related to one age groups and focus on how the social environment influences the existence, emergency, nature, direction and coping mechanism associated with that issue. You may also choose to make your topic specific to an ethnic or gender category. (Examples: teenage drinking, depression in late adulthood, eating disorders in young adult men, etc.)
Each presentation should include:
• At least four (4) non-textbook references that will help guide your group presentation. At least three (3) references must be an academic, scholarly article from a peer reviewed professional journal that are related to the topic of focus.
• All group members must participate in the presentation on your topic. Creativity is encouraged. During the presentation, be sure to:
• Discuss the social environmental influences on the topic (depression, eating disorder, etc.) and the developmental stage (adolescents, late adulthood, etc.)
• Discuss how the developmental stage influences the topic and is influenced by the topic.
• Incorporate class concepts, terms and theories into your presentation
• Incorporate the information/findings from the 3 current outside references
• Discuss why this topic and the developmental stage are relevant (why it matters) to your peers in the class
• Provide a visual aid – video clips, graphs, PowerPoint, art work, etc.
• Conduct a creative, interactive activity/discussion with the class to enhance your peer’s understanding of the group’s featured topic.
• Be prepared to answer questions from the instructor and the class about how your presentation connects to class concepts. All members should be prepared to answer any question posed to the group and not just a question related to a student’s specific portion of the presentation.
Create a 1-2-page typed GROUP summary of the presentation. Make certain all group members are identified on the Summary. Select one group member to submit the GROUP Summary.
Each individual group member must also submit an individual 1-2-page typed (MS Word) reflection/survey of the experience. In this reflection include the following:
• Discuss how the group made decisions, divided tasks, achieved its goals
• Discuss your contributions to the group.
Grading: Grades will be based on appropriate application of theoretical concepts, quality of expression, adherence to the outline provided and adequacy of your individual contributions to the presentation. All group members are responsible for their fair share of the work in completing this assignment and participating in the oral presentation.
5. Poster presentation – Older Adult Self-Portrait Poster Presentation¹
This assignment will afford you the opportunity to incorporate theoretical knowledge of biological and social aging, and identify physical, psychological, spiritual, and social changes in later life. Additionally, you will assess your own values and biases about aging, death and dying, and you will identify the influence of aging on family dynamics. Furthermore, you will be able to dispel major myths about aging and identify wellness and prevention concepts for older adults.
The task is to envision you at the age of 80. You are to assemble a pictorial representation (collage) of yourself on poster board to create a self-portrait of how you expect yourself and your life to be at the age of 80. You can use photographs, drawings, magazine clippings, and words. Be as creative as you can to complete this self-portrait assignment. You will share your self-portrait with the entire class.
Your collage/rendering/presentation is due on the day of your oral presentation. Follow the guideline below in the construction of your self-portrait and in writing your Reflections paper. Make certain to address each topic.
Part I Collage/Rendering Presentation
1. What words would you use to describe yourself physically, psychologically, socially, and spiritually?
2. What activities are you engaged in?
3. Where do you live? With whom?
4. Identify social systems in which you live and how these systems promote or deter you in maintaining or achieving well-being
5. What do you enjoy?
6. What has given you the most satisfaction in your life?
7. What are your strengths?
8. What are you hoping for?
9. What is your worst fear?
10. How has Erikson’s theory of adult development played out in your life in terms of the stage integrity vs. despair? (Make sure to reference)
Part II Reflections Paper
1. Provide a brief summary of the experience and your reflections about this assignment.
2. This assignment is to be typed, MS Word, double spaced, 1” margins, font Times New Roman, size 12. Use APA style for all references in the text of the report and in the bibliography at the end of the report.
3. Correct grammar and spelling is expected.
Grading: Your grade will be based on appropriate application of theoretical concepts, quality of expression, and adherence to the outline provided.
¹This assignment was adapted from the Human Behavior in the Social Environment Curriculum of Western Kentucky University, Program of Social Work posted to the Council on Social Work Education Gero-Ed Center website.